Seti I Mummies

SETI  I

Seti I is considered to be one of the greatest of pharoahs and warriors, and was also the father of another very notable pharoah, Rameses II (or Rameses the Great). Seti ruled in the 19th Dynasty, several generations after Tutankhamen. Surviving accounts of Seti’s exploits tell us that he was highly successful at protecting Egypt from such invaders as the marauding armies of neighboring Libya. Seti was also known to have extended his powers beyond the boundaries of Egypt as far east as modern-day Syria.

TutanKhamen Mummies

TUTANKHAMEN

Tutankhamen, known to many as King Tut, was probably just a boy when he was crowned pharoah in the 18th Dynasty. He was still a teenager when he died of unknown causes and was entombed in the Egyptian Valley of Kings. Although Tutankhamen was not one of the more distinguished or important pharoahs in his own time, he has a very special place in ours.
Tutankhamen’s tomb was discovered in 1922 by Howard Carter. Over the next several years, Carter’s expedition carefully uncoverd the riches within, including the gold mask above. A number of mysterious deaths that followed the opening of the tomb set off wild rumors of a mummy’s curse.

Today, Tut is known to countless people the world over, in part because his is the only pharoah’s tomb ever discovered intact. Tut’s burial site had somehow escaped pillaging by grave robbers for over 3000 years. His mummy and its magnificent solid gold sarcophagus, along with wall paintings, furniture, weapons, games and other artifacts have survived to the present, giving us a unique glimpse at the trappings of an ancient pharoah.

Mummies of Ancient Egypt:Who Were the Mummies? 3

Over time almost all Egyptians who could afford to became mummies when they died — a total of about 70 million mummies in 3,000 years. By the 4th century AD, many Egyptians had become Christians and no longer believed that mummification was necessary for life after death. Eventually, the Egyptians gave up the art and science of making mummies. Continue reading Mummies of Ancient Egypt:Who Were the Mummies? 3

TUTANKHAMUN’S NAME


The name “Tutankhamun” is derived from the hieroglyphs which translate as Tut-ankh-amun meaning the “Living Image of Amun.” Today, many people refer to him as Tut.Tutakhamun's Gold Mask

When Tut was born, he was given the name Tutankhaten meaning the “Living Image of the Aten” – the Aten was the single god worshipped during the rule Akhenaten, the heretic king who is believed to have been the father of Tutankhamun.

Not long after Tutankhaten became Pharaoh, there was a restoration of the previously-deposed state god Amun and Tut’s name was changed to Tutankhamun.

These days, Tut’s name is found with differing spellings, including Tutankhamun, Tutankhamen and Tutankhamon. In reality, we cannot be sure how the ancient Egyptians pronounced the name as they did not write vowels. (Some hieroglyphs are transliterated as vowels, since they are weak consonants). Egyptologists add vowels to assist in communicating information.