Egyptology

Egypt Old MapEgyptology is the study of Ancient Egypt and Egyptian antiquities and is a regional and thematic branch of the larger disciplines of ancient history and archeology. A practitioner of the discipline is an Egyptologist, though Egyptology is not exclusive to such practitioners.
Development of the field:

Egyptology investigates the range of Ancient Egyptian cultures (language, literature, history, religion, art, economics, and ethics) from the 5th millennium BC up to the end of Pagan religion in the 4th century AD.
Some of the first historical accounts of Egypt was given by Herodotus, Strabo, Diodorus Siculus and the largely lost work of Manetho, an Egyptian priest, during the reign of Ptolemy I and Ptolemy II in the 3rd century BC. Continue reading Egyptology

Morals and Sexual Morality

“In the Life in Ancient Egypt”


Modesty, as distinct from fidelity, was not prominent among the Egyptians; they spoke of sexual affairs with a directness alien to our late sexual morality.

Harem in Ancient Egypt

Life in Ancient Egypt, Morals and Sexual Morality

Ancient Egyptians adorned their very temples with pictures and bas-reliefs of startling anatomical candor, and supplied their dead with obscene literature to amuse them in the grave.

Blood ran warm along the Nile: girls were nubile at ten, and premarital morals were free and easy; one courtesan, in Ptolemaic days, was reputed to have built a pyramid with her savings; even sodomy had its clientele.

Dancing-girls, in the manner of Japan, were accepted into the best male society as providers of entertainment and physical edification.

They dressed in diaphanous robes, or contented themselves with anklets, bracelets and rings.

Evidences occur of religious prostitution on a small scale.

As late as the Roman occupatcion the most beautiful girl among the noble families of Thebes was chosen to be consecrated to Amon.

When she was too old to satisfy the god she received an honorable discharge, married, and moved in the highest circles.

It was a civilization with different prejudices from our own.

Khufu

(2589-2566 BC) was the 4th Dynasty (2613-2498) pharaoh who built the Great Pyramid of Giza. Originally, the Great Pyramid stood 481 feet (146.6 m) tall. Although commonly called Cheops (and also Suphis) because of the late Greek influence on Egypt, the name Khufu is the original ancient Egyptian name for this king as demonstrated by his own cartouche. He reigned for approximately 24 years. Continue reading Khufu

Sneferu

Horus Name Horus Neb-Maat, “Horus, Lord of the Cosmological Order”
Nebty Name Neb-maat-nebty “The Two Ladies, the Lord of the Cosmological Order
Golden Horus Name Bik-nub “The Golden Falcon”
Praenomen Sneferu, Snofru
Nomen Snefru, Snofru
Manetho Soris
King Lists Snofru
Alternate Names Snefru, Sneferu, Seneferu, Snefrou, Snofrou, Snofru

Dates what's this?

manetho reigned 29 years Continue reading Sneferu

Ancient Egypt

Papyrus from the Book of the Dead of Any

Towards the end of the fourth millennium BC several independent city-states were unified to form a single state, marking the beginning of over 3,000 years of pharaonic civilisation in the Nile Valley. Fertile earth left behind after the yearly Nile flood provided the basis for Egypt’s agricultural prosperity, a key factor in the longevity of the civilisation. Continue reading Ancient Egypt

Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

Omar Khayyam,
The Astronomer-Poet of Persia.

Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of our Eleventh, and died within the First Quarter of our Twelfth Century. The Slender Story of his Life is curiously twined about that of two other very considerable Figures in their Time and Country: one of whom tells the Story of all Three. This was Nizam ul Mulk, Vizier to Alp Arslan the Son, and Malik Shah the Grandson, of Toghrul Beg the Tartar, who had wrested Persia from the feeble Successor of Mahmud the Great, and founded that Seljukian Dynasty which finally roused Europe into the Crusades. This Nizam ul Mulk, in his Wasiyat–or Testament–which he wrote and left as a Memorial for future Statesmen–relates the following, as quoted in the Calcutta Review, No. 59, from Mirkhond’s History of the Assassins. Continue reading Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam