Mayan Codices


Maya codices (singular codex) are folding books stemming the Maya , written in Maya hieroglyphic script on Mesoamerican paper, made from the inner bark of certain trees, the main being the wild fig tree or Amate (Ficus glabrata).

Paper, generally known by the Nahuatl word amatl, was named by the Mayas huun. The folding books are the products of professional scribes working under the patronage of the Howler Monkey Gods. The Maya developed their huun-paper around the 5th century,[1] the same era that the Romans did, but their paper was durable and a better surface than papyrus[2]. The codices have been named for the cities in which they eventually settled. The Dresden codex is generally considered the most important of the few that survive.

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