History of Akkadia

During the 3rd Millennium BC, the and the Akkadians lived peacefully together and created conditions for a common high .

A few centuries later the first Akkadian king, Sargon of Akkad, ruled over an empire that included a large part of Mesopotamia. The ancient name Akkadian is derived the -state of Akkad. It appears that Semitic speaking had lived for centuries amidst and gradually became an integral part of the Sumerian . We don’t hear much about them in the first part of the 3rd millennium, because the scholarly used in writing at that time was Sumerian.

Akkadia was founded by Sargon I when he conquered . Sargon reigned from 2334 to 2279 BCE, and during those fifty-five years Akkadia became the ’s first empire. During his reign, the Akkadian language became the lingua franca of the . Along with the language came the Semitic culture it represented. The Shinar, the home of the tribe of Terach, father of Abraham, about 2400 BCE, was ancient Akkadia. It later became Babylonia, and it is now (roughly) Iraq. The art of glassmaking was born in Akkadia. It was a Semitic, and then a Jewish, art for the next three millennia. Glassmaking was unique among the arts, for it was invented only once in all of human history. Its spread through the world was parallel to, and coincident with, the dispersal of the Jews.

Akkadian is one of cultural languages of world history. Akkadian (or Babylonian-Assyrian) is the collective name for the spoken languages of the culture in Mesopotamia, the area between the rivers Euphrates and Tigris. Deciphered in the 1850s, Akkadian is the medium of innumerable documents from daily life as well as a vast , including the famous Epic of Gilgamesh, the quest of a man for eternal life.

Akkadian, the oldest known member of the family of Semitic languages, succeeded Sumerian as the vernacular tongue of Mesopotamia and was spoken by the and Assyrians over a of nearly two thousand years. It was written in the cuneiform script invented by the Sumerians, and the surviving documentation covers the from 2350 BC to the first century AD. The oldest known writing employed by Semitic-speaking peoples is cuneiform. It was adopted by the Akkadians ca.2500 BC from the Sumerians, whose language was not a Semitic tongue.

The city of Babel is thought to have been Babylon and the word babel comes originally from the Akkadian Bab-ilu meaning “gate of God”.

The earliest surviving inscriptions in the language go back to about 2,500 BC and are the oldest known written records in a Semitic tongue. The Semitic languages are named after Shem or Sem, the oldest son of Noah, from whom most of the languages’ speakers were said to be descended.

By the first century AD Akkadian had become an extinct language replaced as a spoken language by Aramaic.

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