Selected Bibliography

Abraham, Richard, Rosa Luxemburg.

Abboushi, W.F., The Unmaking of Palestine. Continue reading Selected Bibliography

The Neo-Elamite period

A long period of darkness separates  the Middle and Neo-Elamite periods. In  742 BC a certain Huban-nugash is  mentioned as king in Elam. The land  appears to have been divided into  separate principalities, with the central  power fairly weak. The next 100 years  witnessed the constant attempts of  the Elamites to interfere in  Mesopotamian affairs, usually in  alliance with Babylon, against the  constant pressure of Neo-Assyrian  expansion. At times they were  successful with this policy, both  militarily and diplomatically, but on the  whole they were forced to give way to increasing Assyrian power. Local  Elamite dynastic troubles were from  time to time compounded by both  Assyrian and Babylonian interference.  Meanwhile, the Assyrian army whittled  away at Elamite power and influence in  Luristan. In time these internal and  external pressures resulted in the near total collapse of any  meaningful central authority in Elam. In  a series of campaigns between 692  and 639 BC, in an effort to clean up a  political and diplomatic mess that had become a chronic headache for the  Assyrians, Ashurbanipal’s armies  utterly destroyed Susa, pulling down  buildings, looting, and sowing the land  of Elam with salt.

The Life of Cyrus The Great

[1.1.1] The thought once occurred to us how many republics have been overthrown by people who preferred to live under any form of government other than a republican, and again, how many monarchies and how many oligarchies in times past have been abolished by the people. We reflected, moreover, how many of those individuals who have aspired to absolute power have either been deposed once for all and that right quickly; or if they have continued in power, no matter for how short a time, they are objects of wonder as having proved to be wise and happy men. Then, too, we had observed, we thought, that even in private homes some people who had rather more than the usual number of servants and some also who had only a very few were nevertheless, though nominally masters, quite unable to assert their authority over even those few.

[1.1.2] And in addition to this, we reflected that are the rulers of their horses, and that all who are called herdsmen might properly be regarded as the rulers of the animals over which they are placed in charge. Now we noticed, as we thought, that all these herds obeyed their keepers more readily than men obey their rulers. For the herds go wherever their keeper directs them and graze in those places to which he leads them and keep out of those from which he excludes them. They allow their keeper, moreover, to enjoy, just as he will, the profits that accrue from them. And then again, we have never known of a herd conspiring against its keeper, either to refuse obedience to him or to deny him the privilege of enjoying the profits that accrue. At the same time, herds are more intractable to strangers than to their rulers and those who derive profit from them. Men, however, conspire against none sooner than against those whom they see attempting to rule over them.
Continue reading The Life of Cyrus The Great

Welcome To The Nile Gift in Egypt

Egypt Old MapEgypt, officially the Arab Republic of Egypt, (ˈiː.dʒɪpt (help·info), Egyptian: Kemet; Coptic: Ⲭⲏⲙⲓ Kīmi; Arabic: مصر‎ Miṣr; Egyptian Arabic: Máṣr) is a country in North Africa. The Sinai Peninsula is part of Egypt, but forms a land bridge to Asia. Covering an area of about 1,001,450 square kilometers (386,660 sq mi), Egypt borders Libya to the west, Sudan to the south and the Gaza Strip and Israel to the east. The northern coast borders the Mediterranean Sea; the eastern coast borders the Red Sea.

Egypt is one of the most populous countries in Africa and the Middle East. The great majority of its estimated 80,300,000 people (2007 US State Department estimate) live near the banks of the Nile River, in an area of about 40,000 square kilometers (15,000 sq mi), where the only arable agricultural land is found.
The large areas of the Sahara Desert are sparsely inhabited. About half of Egypt’s residents live in urban areas, with the majority spread across the densely-populated centres of greater Cairo, Alexandria and other major cities in the Nile Delta. Continue reading Welcome To The Nile Gift in Egypt

The Governmental System In Ancient Egypt

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Egypt had one of the first organized governments. Before Upper and Lower Egypt were united, each area was ruled by a king. In 3100 BC, after the country was united into a centralized system of government, it was then divided into 42 nomes, or regions. A governor ruled each region but had to obey the pharaoh.

The pharaoh was the highest authority and had total power over the people. The pharaoh controlled the executive and judicial branches of government and was assisted by many appointed civil servants. When selecting these aides, the pharaoh had to follow the legal rules of seniority and literacy.

Government officials in the Old Kingdom held positions such as the Royal Courtiers, Advisors, Councilors, and Ministers. The Royal Court’s status grew over time and covered religious, civil, judicial, and military duties. The Advisor was the highest official in the state, but not a member of the government’s higher Council. The Council was comprised of senior state officials who enforced legislation and royal decrees and later assumed judiciary functions. The Minister was the head of the judges. Continue reading The Governmental System In Ancient Egypt

Education of Ethnic Minorities in China

Education serves as the cornerstone of science and technology advancement and Chinese government has adopted a series of preferential policies and treatments to develop education of ethnic minorities as follows: it highlights and helps the ethnic groups to develop their own education and establishes special institutions for democratic education management; Meanwhile, it entitles and respects ethnic minorities and places where national autonomy are practiced to develop education in their own way, attaches great importance to the education of minorities’ corresponding languages and bilingual education and redoubles its efforts to develop textbooks written in their languages; besides, it strengthens measures to develop minorities’ own teaching staffs and provides special financial treatment to ethnic minorities and places where they live; furthermore, it establishes various types of school in accordance with the actual situation of ethnic minorities and their residential areas and it adopts special enrollment policy in designated regions where ethnic groups live in compact community in order to cultivate more people with corresponding expertise for these regions; last but not least, it provides favorable treatment in enrollment and campus life for ethnic students and encourages developed regions in other part of China to establish regular tie of assistance with corresponding areas where ethnic minorities live. Continue reading Education of Ethnic Minorities in China