Pre-Columbian pottery female figure

A very striking fragment from a pottery figure of a nude curvaceous female.

Pre-Columbian, possibly Guerrero, 2nd Millennium BC

Size: 9.5 x 6.2 cms

Fragment as shown

Ex. private collection, Oxford, UK. Continue reading Pre-Columbian pottery female figure

Ancient Trading Raft Sails Anew

From :

ScienceDaily: Ancient Civilization News

For the first time in nearly 500 years, a full-size balsa-wood raft just like those used in pre-Columbian Pacific trade took to the water on Sunday, May 10. Only this time, instead of the Pacific coast between Mexico and Chile where such rafts carried goods between the great civilizations of the Andes and Mesoamerica as long as a millennium ago, the replica raft was floated in the Charles River basin. – Please Ream More..

www.TarikheMa.ir

Mayan Codices


Maya codices (singular codex) are folding books stemming from the pre-Columbian Maya civilization, written in Maya hieroglyphic script on Mesoamerican paper, made from the inner bark of certain trees, the main being the wild fig tree or Amate (Ficus glabrata).

Paper, generally known by the Nahuatl word amatl, was named by the Mayas huun. The folding books are the products of professional scribes working under the patronage of the Howler Monkey Gods. The Maya developed their huun-paper around the 5th century,[1] the same era that the Romans did, but their paper was more durable and a better writing surface than papyrus[2]. The codices have been named for the cities in which they eventually settled. The Dresden codex is generally considered the most important of the few that survive.